Tag Archives: english

The Enchanted Wood by Enid Blyton

I am totally besotted with anything Enid Blyton. And even within her huge body of works, the Magic Faraway Tree is one of my favorites since this also falls under one of my favorite genres – fantasy. Enchanted Wood is the beginning of the series. For me, fantasy is about the wonder in discovering the new worlds. This being the first book is the one where we discover the Faraway Tree, the folks who live on it and the magic associated with it. Of course, the wonder remains throughout this series because new lands keep coming on top of the Faraway Tree. So throughout the series, there are new lands to discover. That way for a reread, these stories kind of lose their value once you know what land.

Selected Stories by W.W. Jacobs – Book Review

Synopsis:

The Masterpieces of World Fiction series brings together the best-loved short stories by the great masters of the genre – from Chekov and Maupassant, Kipling and Wilde, to O. Henry and Saki and Tolstoy and Conrad. Thoughtfully compiled by the bestselling author Terry O’ Brien, this series is a great way for readers to revisit old favourites and for introducing literary masterpieces to newer, younger readers.

Jorasanko by Aruna Chakravarty


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‘Jorasanko Thakurbari’ is Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s ancestral house which has now been converted into a museum dedicated to his life and works. Built in 1785, the Jorasanko Thakur Bari is spread over 35000 square meters. Today the building houses Rabindra Bharati University, inaugurated by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru on Gurudev’s birth centenary, 8 May 1962. Rabindranath Tagore was born and breathed his last in Jorasanko Thakurbari. The museum has three galleries dedicated to Tagore, members of his family and the Bengal Renaissance. The galleries provide glimpses of intimate family photographs, live size portraits and Kavi Guru’s evolution as a poet & philosopher.

The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni – Book Review

Synopsis:

A retelling of the timeless Indian epic, the Mahabharata with a modern twist The Palace of Illusions takes us back to a time that is half-history, half-myth, and wholly magical; narrated by Panchali, the wife of the five Pandava brothers, we are finally given a woman’s take on the timeless tale that is the Mahabharata Tracing Panchali’s life from fiery birth and lonely childhood, where her beloved brother is her only true companion; through her complicated friendship with the enigmatic Krishna; to marriage, motherhood and Panchali’s secret attraction to the mysterious man who is her husbands’ most dangerous enemy. The Palace of Illusions is a deeply human novel about a woman born into a man’s world, a world of warriors, gods and the ever-manipulating hands of fate.

The Diary Of A Young Girl by Anne Frank – Book Review

Synopsis:

Anne Frank was a Jewish teenager who wrote a diary about her time in hiding during the Second World War. “The Diary of a Young Girl” is the diary written by this young girl from 14 June, 1942 to 1 August, 1944. Throughout the diary, she has talked about what it was like to be a Jew in the war; and to constantly be in fear while in hiding. Through her diary, she tells us the violence and cruelty of war times and sufferings of people. The entire scenario was described in such a vivid manner full of emotions that one can visualise her life with one’s own eyes.

The diary also talks about how she changed as a person during the two years of hiding. Anne Frank was only fifteen when she died in a concentration camp in Germany.

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier – Book Review

Synopsis:

Featured among one of the top 10 Fictions of the Millennium(1901 – 2000), Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier is one my most favourite novels. It tells the story of a young, unnamed protagonist who works as a companion with a rich American lady and comes to Monte Carlo with her, where she meets Maxim de Winter, a handsome, older gentleman. She marries Maxim de Winter and comes to ‘Manderley’ as the second Mrs. De Winter with him.

It is well known that Maxim’s widely adored wife Rebecca, had recently drowned at sea and he loved his wife very much and after her death, is shattered completely. The protagonist, due to the circumstances in her life, lacks self-confidence and after coming to Manderley after her marriage, finds it very difficult to cope with the new life style and the expectations that the people have from Mrs. De Winter. She also faces a painful struggle against the aura of Rebecca, Maxim’s first wife, that still prevails at each and every corner of the house and the country. Maxim’s new wife is constantly compared to Rebecca, who was loved and admired by all.