Tag Archives: #indianwriting

Prem Purana by Usha Narayanan – Book Review

Synopsis:

Stories of love and extraordinary devotion
No one is untouched by love, not even devas (gods) and asuras (demons), kings and nymphs. And when they face life’s unexpected tribulations, their love also undergoes trials. Read how Ganesha took myriad forms to please Riddhi, Siddhi and Buddhi, how Ravana shared an unbreakable bond with his true love, Mandodari and how Nal and Damayanti’s relationship was tested till nothing remained.
Tormented by passion, wracked by betrayal, torn by the agony of separation, love in its many splendored forms is the origin of these incredibly endearing stories of Prem Purana.

The Tree with a Thousand Apples by Sanchit Gupta – Book Review

Synopsis:

Inspired by true events, this riveting narrative traces the lives of Safeena Malik, Deewan Bhat and Bilal Ahanagar, three childhood friends who grow up in an atmosphere of peace and amity in Srinagar, Kashmir, until the night of 20 January 1990 changes it all.

While Deewan is forced to flee from his home, Safeena’s mother becomes ‘collateral damage’ and Bilal has to embrace a wretched life of poverty and fear. The place they called paradise becomes a battleground and their friendship struggles when fate forces them to choose sides against their will.

Mrs Funnybones by Twinkle Khanna – Book Review

Synopsis:

Almost everyone has a similar family story in India and this is what Mrs Funnybones or rather Twinkle Khanna pokes fun at. The husband who’s the “man of the house”, the crazy mothers in law, friends and of course the constant jibes at her weight make it an intriguing read. Everything comes together to leave the reader cackling away in laughter.

Shatranj Ke Khiladi by Munshi Premchand – Book Review

शतरंज के खिलाड़ी मुंशी प्रेमचंद द्वारा लिखित एक लघुकथा है जिसमे एक बार फिर उन्होंने पाठकों के समक्ष समाज का एक आइना प्रस्तुत किया है। इस पुस्तक में १९ स्वी सदी के अवध के उस पक्ष का चित्रण किया गया है जब नवाबों से लेकर आम नागरिक तक  विलासिता में लीन थे। शासन विभाग में, साहित्य क्षेत्र में, सामाजिक अवस्था में, कला कौशल में, उद्योग धंधों में, आहार व्यवहार में सर्वत्र विलासिता व्याप्त हो रही थी। जीवन के प्रत्येक विभाग में आमोद प्रमोद का वास था। सभी की आँखों में विलासिता का मद छाया हुआ था। संसार में क्या हो रहा है, इसकी किसी को ख़बर न थी। बटेर लड़ रहे हैं। तीतरों की लड़ाई के लिए पाली बदली  जा रही है। कहीं चौसर बिछी हुई है; पौ-बारह का शोर मचा हुआ है। कहीं शतरंज का घोर संग्राम छिड़ा हुआ है। और इसी विलासिता के मद में अंधी लखनऊ नगरी देख ही नहीं पाई कब अंग्रजों ने अवध पर कब्जा कर लिया।

Jorasanko by Aruna Chakravarty


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‘Jorasanko Thakurbari’ is Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s ancestral house which has now been converted into a museum dedicated to his life and works. Built in 1785, the Jorasanko Thakur Bari is spread over 35000 square meters. Today the building houses Rabindra Bharati University, inaugurated by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru on Gurudev’s birth centenary, 8 May 1962. Rabindranath Tagore was born and breathed his last in Jorasanko Thakurbari. The museum has three galleries dedicated to Tagore, members of his family and the Bengal Renaissance. The galleries provide glimpses of intimate family photographs, live size portraits and Kavi Guru’s evolution as a poet & philosopher.

The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni – Book Review

Synopsis:

A retelling of the timeless Indian epic, the Mahabharata with a modern twist The Palace of Illusions takes us back to a time that is half-history, half-myth, and wholly magical; narrated by Panchali, the wife of the five Pandava brothers, we are finally given a woman’s take on the timeless tale that is the Mahabharata Tracing Panchali’s life from fiery birth and lonely childhood, where her beloved brother is her only true companion; through her complicated friendship with the enigmatic Krishna; to marriage, motherhood and Panchali’s secret attraction to the mysterious man who is her husbands’ most dangerous enemy. The Palace of Illusions is a deeply human novel about a woman born into a man’s world, a world of warriors, gods and the ever-manipulating hands of fate.

Anamika by Soorina Desai – Book Review

Synopsis:

Life perhaps has no story to tell. This book is about birth, a search for an identity, intense emotion, illusion, disillusion,acceptance, death and a personal definition of eternity. All pieced together for us to look back and see that we managed because we survived from moment to moment.

Even an ordinary life has one extraordinary chapter of love in it. This is Anamika’s tale of a pure but forbidden love, set in newly independent India, an era when romance had a different meaning and the language of romance had a different allure. Perhaps the content of this book is for everybody who has been ruled by the heart, lost a lover without losing love, asked questions to God but found answers within, and embraced life knowing it can be enjoyed only in small doses.

Gora by Rabindranath Tagore – Book Review

Synopsis:

Gora, the protagonist, is a very staunch follower of Hinduism and has very high regards for his religion. He is not only a strong advocate of his religion but practices Hinduism thorough strict austerity and conviction. He is a very good orator and the leadership qualities are imbibed in him naturally. At heart, he is very optimist who dreams about ideal Bharatvarsha, a prosperous and happy India that can only be achieved when all castes and classes are united under the large umbrella of Hinduism. Gora is highly patriotic and sympathetic by nature who can not stand injustice and inhuman treatment done by the upper society towards the poor and downtrodden. The impelling attitude of Gora makes him seem like a violent and arrogant person.

Datta by Sharat Chandra Chattopadhyay – Book Review

Synopsis:

Datta is one of the most popular novels by Sharat Chandra Chattopadhyay. It is a romantic novel set in Victorian Bengal with a backdrop of Bengali society fragmented into Hindu and Brahmo (Brahma Samaj). The main story revolves around the relationship between an affluent Brahmo woman and a brilliant but indigent young Hindu.

Datta means a girl whose marriage has been committed with a particular boy by her parents / guardians to that boy’s parents / guardians. In short, Datta (literally meaning ‘given’) stands for betrothed (female).